msjann65 (msjann65) wrote in 100steps,
msjann65
msjann65
100steps

May 15, 2007

Here's the most recent long walk (that is, up to a point - I actually walked a greater distance, but stopped taking pictures after the final one in this set.


A little over 100 steps from home, traveling south on Joy Street, climbing the last plateau of Beacon Hill on the way to Boston Common. On the next block we crest the Hill and head downhill, still on Joy Street toward Beacon.



At the corner of Joy and Beacon Streets while I was waiting for a walk light along came a Duck Tour amphibian.  The passengers waved at me and gave a customary "Quack, Quack!" and I responded in kind.  These are war surplus vehicles which tour Boston's historical areas by land and end up with a splashdown in the Charles River over by Science Park.   I have never been on one - the price is kind of prohibitive.


Inside Boston Common, now heading west, a peacful warm sunny day.  People take afternoon naps out here under the shade trees.


The is the Tadpole Playground on Boston Common, for kids under seven years of age (must be accompanied by an adult).  It is located next to the Frog Pond Wading Pool.  The playground also has sprinklers that turn on and off periodically to cool off the little ones (and parents, if they wish)


I just had to take a picture of this young man. He is one of about five lifeguards who circle the Frog Pond and watch out for the kids who are wading.  The pool is not really deep enough for swimming, but one can float on one's back.  Although it is technically for kids, adults also enjoy the fountain on a hot sultry day like Wednesday, May 9, 2007.  The Frog Pond opens for wading the first of May and closes after Labor Day.  It opens again I believe around Thanksgiving for winter ice skating - skate rentals are available,  and snacks in the  nearby clubhouse whenever the pond is open.


The Frog Pond, Boston Common, with view of #1 Beacon St building.  Notice the grownups standing in the spray?


In the Boston Public Garden:  Mrs. Quack and family - Jack Zack Quack Mack Hack Rack Tack & Wack, (or something like that) - inspired by Robert McCloskey's childhood classic story "Make Way for Ducklings". 
 


Tulip Time at the Public Garden, Boston - May 2007


Public Garden Lagoon with the world's smallest suspension bridge - see resident swan in foreground


I was watching these two swans (previously named Romeo and Juliet - last year it was discovered that they are really both girls, so were quickly renamed Julia and Juliet) -  watched them ducking in the water, tails up and preening their wing feathers.  I took a couple of pictures, and then as if they realized they were being photgraphed, the little dears came on shore and started flapping wings and stretching.  I was prevented from getting any closer by a fence and a sign asking us not to disturb the swans and ducks (nesting area on Duck Island nearby).  See the Swan Boat approaching the island?


A swan boat returning to base after rounding Duck Island


George Washington statue and plantings near the Arlington Street end of the Public Garden (West side)


This was the former Hotel Vendome on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston.  Today it is a high priced condo development (approx. $1,000,000 per unit).  The hotel was destroyed in 1972 by a huge fire - five alarms - several firemen were trapped in the building when the roof fell in and I believe it was eight of them who died there.  The fellow who was best man at my sister's wedding was one of the trapped firefighters who was rescued, amazingly unhurt.  He recently retired from the Boston Fire Department.


The Firefighters' Monument i - on the Commonwealth Avenue Mall across from the former Hotel Vendome.  The names of all the men who died that day are engraved on the granite wall, and on top of the wall is a bronze fireman's helmet and coat.

The Women's Memorial in Boston on Commonwealth Avenue Mall.  Phyllis Wheatley, a black slave in the early 1700's and a famous poet, is memorialized here.  Also Abigail Adams, the wife of John Adams, and the early feminist suffragette Lucy Stone. 

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